“Take everything from the exchanges, Miley gave us”: criticism in Argentina

The approval of a new regulation for Bitcoin (BTC) and the cryptocurrency industry in Argentina has drawn endless criticism. This has been revealed by the questions that users have expressed on the social network.

As reported by CriptoNoticias, the Argentine Senate amended the anti-money laundering law and introduced the figure of registration of cryptocurrency service providers, Which is in charge and supervised by the National Securities Commission (CNV).

For different users, this regulation is interpreted as President Xavier Miley deviating from its liberal principlesAllowing laws to be made to establish control, as occurs in communist regimes.

In direct responses to CNV messages related to the registration of service providers, users like @FrankFal97 Blame to miley Contrary to communist practices and contrary to the freedom it so trumpets.

“Mili, not this. This is being communist. It should be immediately withdrawn,” said the user, who indicated in another message that “this measure is inexcusable, it should be rejected.”

Other users see the action Miley sees cryptocurrency as a betrayal to users in Argentina. in social networks

“Take everything from the exchanges registered in Argentina, Miley has already delivered it to us,” Said @arkan_bit, who is expected to be subject to greater surveillance by the Argentine state.

For some, Miley moves away from his liberal principles and recommends withdrawing funds from exchanges. Source: X.

Sights of the CNV “Closer”

Ana Ojeda, a Venezuelan lawyer and executive director of the law firm Legal Rocks, also commented. For that, Argentinian users will be subject to greater control and supervision by the CNV. In fact, their eyes will be on that regulatory body “near”,

Even Ojeda has faced questions over this measure, particularly from Javier Miley, whom many have singled out as a defender of the principles and philosophy that comprise the Bitcoin ecosystem.

“Imagination and idealization are dead for some people. (Miley) In fact, it was never a rumor that some Bitcoiners fantasized about anarchy-state, the President had a tremendous surprise for them! couple Ojeda.

According to what is established in the new rules, CNV is responsible for registration of cryptocurrency service providers. It also stipulates that this body will have the power to regulate the operations of cryptocurrency service providers, meaning (such as bans).

Standard Argentina reaches both exchanges and companies, like foreigners. However, Ojeda considers it difficult to apply it to international exchange houses, as they are not legally constituted in Argentina.They are not required to register with regulators.

The amendment approved in the Senate arises from the pressure put on Argentinian authorities by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), which recently visited that country and confirmed that up to that moment, a rule for exchange As he has proposed in the past.

This regulation is actually the establishment of a registry of suppliers that helps reduce the use of cryptocurrencies for the commission of crimes such as money laundering or terrorist financing, despite the fact that the movement of fiat money involves criminals. More relevance remains. According to the United States government, exclude these activities.

Questions have been raised on this measure since its approval in the Senate. “President Miley was wrong to introduce the idea of ​​regulating centralized exchanges operated by foreigners and citizens in our country,” some expressed Argentina at that time.

In any case, Argentina has already approved the amendment. Exchanges have an obligation to register with CNV In less than 45 days, the period given by the regulatory body to legally recognize companies in the Bitcoin sector operating in Argentina.

The registry is already open and companies need to go to CNV to join the registry. Other, They will not be able to continue operations in ArgentinaAs stated by CNV President Roberto Silva.


This note was written in collaboration with Marianella Vanci (editor).

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